Pointe Du Hoc

Today, at Pointe De Hoc in Normandy made us realize what a true hero James Earl Rudder was and what he did in World War II was beyond courageous. “On June 6, 1944 he led the United States Army 2nd Ranger Battalion in the capture and neutralization of the German coastal battery at Pointe Du Hoc.” In order to succeed in this mission, they had to get up these steep, rocky, 100 foot cliffs. This was seen as crucial in the Allied force’s success in their invasion of Normandy and eventually the liberation of Normandy. The original 225 Rudder’s Rangers fought 2 and half days before any help arrived. 90 men survived the mission. 

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Gig’Em to a former Aggie, James Earl Rudder. Not only was he a Major General in the United States Army, but he was also the 16th president of Texas A & M and the Mayor of Brady, Texas. James was born in my mama’s hometown Eden, Texas and knew my Grandpapa, John Harrod. My Grandpapa also fought during this time, but in the Pacific near Manila, Philippines.


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Pointe Du Hoc is located between the Utah and Omaha beaches. “These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.” Ronald Reagan 

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We toured several concrete bunkers where the Germans hid weapons and attacked from as our Allied troops approached the beaches of Normandy. Walking around inside these destroyed German bunkers was a bit dark and eerie.

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I look forward to teaching this cute little thing more about our explorations and travels in Normandy when she is a little older.

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Maci our map reader is guiding us around Pointe Du Hoc, but watching out for the huge craters all along the grounds from Allied Bombs.

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Reflecting back on this mission, “I wish someone would tell me how we did that.” James Earl Rudder

Being here was a completely humble experience. What an honor it was to freely go back to Normandy as a family and learn the history behind a tragic day, but a day that led to liberation and eventually an end to World War II in the spring of 1945. Click here to see how more of Normandy remember D-day.

Comments

  1. Maggie McInnis says:

    This is so wonderful that ya’ll had the opportunity to visit Normandy and on the 70th anniversary! Just taking a walk back into time had right their on the beach had to be a memory maker in itself.
    Grandpapa Harrod, was very good friends with Earl & Chic Rudder through the years. Maybe when you head to Wall you can make arrangements to visit the Eden Museum and see Earl Rudder’s display…pretty impressive. Amazing photography, Jessica! Great job!

    Can’t wait to hear all about it soon. Love, Mom

  2. Cecilia Wagner says:

    Thanks for the history lesson on James Earl Rudder. Hearing it and then actually seeing it in pictures are completely different. I’m sure seeing it in person is even more amazing. Wow! To be there. Thank you for sharing dear ones.

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